Poetry

Showing 31–40 of 46 results

  • Sketches from the Sierra de Tejeda – John Fuller

    £15.00

    The sonnet can be an elevated and metaphysical form, as in the sequences of the Elizabethans, but it can also record the minutiae of life, as the Romantic poets discovered. John Fuller’s new sequence combines something of these two traditions: it tracks a deep seasonal awareness of existence in time and place, but is also simply an annotation of observations of natural life, —the fruit, trees, insects, mountains, and wine of Andalusia. The sonnets are like cautious pencil sketches for some larger but postponed statement.

     

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  • Revenants – Alan Jenkins

    £15.00

    The revenants in this, Alan Jenkins’s sixth collection, come out of childhood and the recent past, out of the long shadow of war and its legacy of silence, out of Old English and contemporary England, in a gathering of unforgettably poignant poems. Speaking of lives lived quietly in the suburbs of London or ended among the savagery of Homs, they bring powerful intimations of mortality, messages and memories from lost worlds and times, in a range of exacting forms and skilfully managed registers.

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  • ODI BARBARE – Geoffrey Hill

    £20.00

    Odi Barbare is the second in Geoffrey Hill’s sequence The Daybooks, and the third to be published. It was preceded by Daybooks III: Oraclau |Oracles (2010) and Daybooks IV: Clavics (2011). The others in the series, to appear in the Collected Poems 1952-2012 from Oxford University Press in 2013, are: Al Tempo de’ Tremuoti and Liber Illustrium Virorum…

     

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  • The Lost World – Alan Jenkins

    £10.00

    ‘No human ingenuity could suggest a means of bridging the chasm which yawned between ourselves and our past lives. One instant had altered the whole conditions of our existence….’ (Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World). Looked back on from middle age, childhood and the adults who peopled it seem as fabulous as the dinosaurs of Conan Doyle’s famous tale. For the parents of anyone born, like Alan Jenkins, in England in the 1950s, the ‘one instant’ that had ‘altered the whole conditions of their existence’ was still in the recent past: a terrifyingly destructive war that was in turn taking on, to a new generation, the shape of myth or fable…

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  • The Green Rose – Alan Gillis

    £20.00

    ‘This carefully orchestrated collection showcases a striking new development in the work of a fast-emerging poet. From the North of Ireland, but now living in Edinburgh, deeply in tune with his forbearers and contemporaries, yet freshly independent, Gillis offers a vibrant new perspective on our changing archipelago. The Green Rose distils, in concentrated form, a poetic that powerfully combines range and variety with unity and resonance…

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  • Laurels and Donkeys – Andrew Motion

    £15.00

    This profoundly moving new book is a sequence of war poems referring to 20th – and 21st-century conflicts that have involved British forces: among them, the First World War, the Second World War, the war in Iraq and the war in Afghanistan. Several of the poems are based on memories of the poet’s father, who landed at D-day and fought in France and Germany; many more take the words of other soldiers (from books, interviews and suchlike) to create ‘found poems’ that are in a sense collaborations between the author and his source…

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  • From Another Island – Pàdraig Macaoidh

    £10.00

    Pàdraig Macaoidh is a native Gaelic speaker from the Isle of Lewis. His pamphlet offers poems in English, including the title poem, and in Gaelic, for which en face English versions are provided by the author, and in one instance by Ciaran Carson. Together the poems redouble the otherness of their title, playing brilliantly on the cultural ironies that accrue when an ancient language faces up to and bears down upon a world (a colonial politics), that has for centuries conspired with all its might to silence it…

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  • ORACLAU | ORACLES – Geoffrey Hill

    £15.00

    Since the publication of A Treatise of Civil Power in 2007, Geoffrey Hill has completed five new collections. Under the general title The Daybooks, they include Al Tempo de’ Tremuoti, Odi Barbare, Oraclau |Oracles, and Clavics

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  • FLOOD – Paul Abbott

    £10.00

    Paul Abbott’s poem FLOOD is a ‘Waste Land’ for the twenty-first century, a timely and daring debut in the disaster genre, by a twenty-one-year-old in his final year at Oxford. Those who have read the first issue of Clutag’s magazine ARCHIPELAGO will have enjoyed a snapshot of the poem in its pages. Now it is offered complete in ten sections, illustrated with eight superbly grainy drawings by Gail McNeillie. The vision here – ‘an Epic Newsflash’ – is one of post-apocalyptic catastrophe ‘couched,’ we’re told in a prefatory note ‘somewhat in the film-cutting style of Soviet montage theory (which I read about on Wikipedia)’…

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  • The Camouflage School – Tom Paulin

    £20.00

    The five poems in this important collection – ‘Sidney Philip’ (a poem about Philip Larkin, his father and the war), ‘Battle of the Atlantic’, ‘My Name is Edward Wadsworth’, ‘Convoy to Archangel’, ‘Noor Inayat Khan (S.O.E. Dachau)’ – are all published here for the first time. They show Tom Paulin writing as movingly, passionately, and inventively as ever he has written before. Part of his continuing ‘loose-leaf’ epic of the Second World War, begun in 2002 with The Invasion Handbook, these poems bear unflinching, compassionate witness to the tragedy of war, and in particular the special horrors of war at sea…

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Showing 31–40 of 46 results